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The Netherlands – KSA confirms 2021 time frame for Dutch online launch

By - 25 November 2019

The Dutch Gambling Authority, the Kansspelautoriteit (KSA), has said its aim is to have the Remote Gambling Act (KOA) come into effect by January 1, 2021, half a year later than the aforementioned date of July 1, 2020.

As soon as the KOA Act comes into force, applications for an online gambling license can be submitted to the Gaming Authority. The plan is that six months later the games of chance market for online games of chance can be opened. KSA expects the market to attract over 90 licence holders.

KSA Chairman René Jansen said of the six month delay: “This with a view to a careful decision-making process on the lower regulations and a thorough implementation of the law. Those with online ambitions may be disappointed. On the other hand, there may be entrepreneurs who are grateful for the extra preparation time that they now get.”

The law legalises online gambling under strict conditions. In addition, the law creates additional requirements in the field of addiction prevention. These apply to providers of online gambling, but also to gaming casinos and the gaming halls.

Dutch Minister for Legal Protection Sander Dekker said two motions were approved alongside the Remote Gaming Act in February this year. One looked to ban online advertising, the other looked to block access to website to providers that weren’t licencesed.

The other asked the government to consider a ban on igaming advertising, and was adopted over another that looked to enforce a blanket ban from the outset.

“Both instruments can be applied to illegal gambling providers and the Gaming Authority will also do this where appropriate,” Mr. Dekker said. “The current gambling policy involves channeling [players to legal site] through attractive offers,” he explained. “This implies that the offer must be sufficiently suitable and attractive for the players to guide players to the legal, reliable and responsible supply. The research conducted shows that channelisation requires some advertising.”

“For providers of online gambling, advertising is even more important than for providers of offline games of chance, such as traditional casinos,” he added. “Possible customers can encounter a casino in the street, even if they do not first see advertising. Banning or seriously restricting gambling advertising is a serious negative can have effects on the degree of channelling.”

Caption: KSA Chairman René Jansen

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